Podcast Transcript Episode 10 – Collagen Supplementation

The Ideal Nutrition Podcast

Leah

00:00:06 – 00:00:42

Hi and welcome to The Ideal Nutrition Podcast. This is Episode 10 and today we are going to be shaking things up a little bit. We’re gonna be talking about collagen supplementation, something I don’t know a whole lot about. I work predominantly with vegan clients and in the vegan space and collagen obviously isn’t a vegan thing. Um, but my co-host, Aiden, um, he’s definitely gone down this rabbit hole quite deeply. So we’re going to get kicked off with kind of talking about how you ended up in this space, like, what got you interested in collagen? 

Aidan

00:00:42 – 00:01:25

So obviously, I’ve always been interested in athletic performance and injury prevention and stuff like that. But the real thing that kicked things off in terms of really generating that interest was Saturday Q and A’s. Somebody asked me a question being like, what are your thoughts on collagen supplementation? And I had read every paper at that time already and jumped to my own conclusions. And my conclusion was that the research is pretty mixed, like it doesn’t look that promising is what I thought. And Tyler, who now works alongside us, but he wasn’t working for me at the time, he sent me a DM of a podcast, and he’s like, hey, dude, I just think you should listen to this and I listen to it and it is by a guy named Dr. Keith Bar.

Aidan

00:01:26 – 00:01:58

Who basically made some very, very valid points, being like when you account for a few variables, every single study that has been done on collagen for injury, the recovery has been overwhelmingly positive. If you look at the research as a whole, and you don’t account for those variables, it doesn’t look that promising. So like, that’s one thing. Like once I looked into those variables and everything like that, it was like, OK, this is actually interesting now. Um, and the second thing, like, as you know, as a lot of people who follow me, obviously the knee injury that’s been an ongoing thing. But even before that, like even like 

Aidan

00:01:58 – 00:02:21

I’ve had pretty much every tendinopathy like you can get pretty much. Um I just remembered my last powerlifting prep I had, like, tendinopathy around my elbow like the golfer’s elbow or tennis elbow. And like every prep I’ve ever done, I’ve had that come up as well. Even to the point that, like I went to play golf and the first swing, it flared it up. And then I had to drive home like one armed. 

Aidan

00:02:21 – 00:02:37

I couldn’t work for the rest of the day as well because I was planning on writing a blog post and was like, I just have to cut work like it literally was affecting my life. Um, so, like, there’s obviously personal interests stemming from those kinds of things and trying to be like, is there anything I can do to improve this stuff for myself? Basically. 

Leah

00:02:37 – 00:02:50

Yeah so, really kind of grasping at straws that, like, what else you could possibly do for your own injuries in terms of that? Collagen supplementation. What injuries is it relevant to? Is it like tendinopathy? Is it more than that? 

Aidan

00:02:50 – 00:03:30

So, tendinopathy is easily the biggest one. It’s really what you call musculoskeletal injuries, so that actually covers 70% of total injuries. So, if we’re onto something here, this should theoretically help with 70% of injuries. It’s anything that’s like tendons, ligaments, bones, and cartilage related to those things. I’m very much stronger in terms of thinking it’s more beneficial for tendons and ligaments for a few reasons that I’ll talk through later. Um, but theoretically it can help all of those things, basically. But it wouldn’t be helpful for stuff like muscle tears, like if you get a muscle tear that has no tendon involvement. Sometimes muscle tears do have tended involvement, but if there’s no tendon involved in it, then it will have no benefit for that basically. 

Leah

00:03:30 – 00:03:36

Got you. Okay, and you use it personally for yourself? in terms of your tendinopathy and ligament tendon stuff. 

Aidan

00:03:36 – 00:03:43

Yes, pretty much any client who has any like tendinopathy or anything like that or ligament injuries. I try to encourage the use of it for sure. 

Leah

00:03:43 – 00:03:48

Okay, so even clients like it. So in terms of the research looking so mixed, 

Leah

00:03:48 – 00:03:49

What pushed you 

Leah

00:03:49 – 00:03:53

to take it for yourself but also start recommending it to clients? 

Aidan

00:03:53 – 00:04:34

So, the big reason it looked mixed – I suppose I’ll just go through the variables to like what research is positive and has in common. So, like starting there, the dosage has to be relatively high like we’re talking 15 to 25 grams of collagen, and it seems to be what it takes to maximise collagen synthesis in the body, which is what we obviously care about. And for context if you just grab an average collagen supplement, you’re looking at typically having anywhere between 2.5 to 10 gram of collagen. Most collagens will have somewhere between 2.5 and 5, like that’s the most common dosage. So, it’s kind of like any time you use that kind of dosage 

Aidan

00:04:35 – 00:05:15

in a study that’s designed for joint health and stuff like that, it’s probably not going to look that positive. So that’s part of why it looks mixed. Another factor is that you need vitamin C for one of the enzymatic processes in collagen synthesis in the body, which therefore means any study that’s been done in a fasting state, which is all of them when it comes to collagen because they try and standardise it in a way that doesn’t use vitamin C, is going to show a negative result. It’s not going to have any difference because it’s missing one of the processes, like vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin. You need to have a relatively recent supply. If you’re fasted you don’t really have enough vitamins in your system to get that job done. And the final thing 

Aidan

00:05:15 – 00:05:40

is the timing of it is important in terms of the research. Timing it like 40 or 60 minutes before the rehab session or whatever seems relatively important because we can’t just target where collagen goes. Like a large percentage of our body is made up of collagen. I’ll talk to the mechanism probably a little bit later, in terms of why that timing matters, why that specific time and stuff like that. But if you time it before you’re providing a stimulus, that area, 

Aidan

00:05:40 – 00:05:59

it makes sense that’s going to have more of an outcome. But that being said, I still question a little bit in terms of like, there’s some studies on osteoarthritis where they just randomly had collagen at random time points through the day, and there has still been improvements in pain and stuff like that. So, it’s like even though timing is important, you might still get benefited even if you haven’t timed it perfectly as well. 

Leah

00:05:59 – 00:06:03

You’d say timing would increase the positive benefit from it? 

Aidan

00:06:03 – 00:06:10

I think dramatically, I think it’s a pretty key variable. I think it’s possible to get improvements without timing, but I think timing is a pretty important factor. 

Leah

00:06:11 – 00:06:16

How would you get the vitamin C in as part of that protocol? 

Aidan

00:06:16 – 00:06:47

So, all the research uses vitamin C supplementation. That’s the way I do it to be most comfortable. But in terms of dosage, I’m looking at 50 milligrams or more of vitamin C. Um, there’s no reason you couldn’t do that through food. It just hasn’t been studied with food and my thought process as well is if you’re not training or fasted, like if you’re training at the end of the day or something like that, you probably have vitamin C in your system, and this probably doesn’t matter. It’s more just looking at it from a research perspective, like they are all done in fasted states. So, it’s relevant from there. 

Aidan

00:06:47 – 00:07:02

I think for the average person, we don’t even need to think about it. But when I do recommend a collagen supplement, I usually recommend the bulk nutrients one simply because it has that dosage, and it has vitamin C already included. It guarantees that that’s covered without the client or whoever actually thinking about it. 

Leah

00:07:02 – 00:07:13

Yeah. Okay. Interesting. Um, uh, let’s get into the mechanisms now, which is something I’m, I guess the least experienced with and I don’t really know much about. So how does it all work? 

Aidan

00:07:14 – 00:07:22

So this is an interesting one in terms of what – I was just saying this the other day because I saw Dr. Karl pop up on Tik Tok. 

Leah

00:07:22 – 00:07:23

I love Dr. Karl. 

Aidan

00:07:23 – 00:07:51

Yep, so do I. But he said this one thing that got a little bit under my skin because I’m like, he’s a really smart guy, and he covers so many areas. And this is the one time he got things a little bit wrong from what I can tell. I suppose I’ve got to preface this by also saying I should have said this at the start. But like, this is a new space for research, and it’s not super strong. There’s not heaps and heaps of research covering this to be clear. That guy I mentioned, Dr Keith Bar, you look at pretty much every collagen paper. 

Aidan

00:07:52 – 00:08:29

on athletic performance, and his name is on every paper pretty much. Like this is a relatively new space. Almost all the research has come out since 2017. So, I’m very open to changing my opinions and all these things. And a lot of this is mechanistic and stuff like that. But in terms of the mechanism and the Dr Karl thing, I was gonna talk about was that he pointed out some things. He got half of it right to a certain degree. He’s like, we can’t just consume collagen supplement because that doesn’t guarantee it’s going to end up affecting the areas we wanted to like hair, skin, nails, etcetera, etcetera, is what he was mostly talking about, um, and also injuries as well, because it breaks down into the amino acids 

Aidan

00:08:29 – 00:09:15

and those just get digested and get used for whatever. That was his logic. But what I want to touch on, though, is that the amino acids in collagen are very different from the amino acids of other good protein sources. Collagen is very high Glycine, Proline, Lysine and Arginine. And to make it clear how different it is um, there’s a thing called biological value for like figuring out what is a good protein source, so to speak, for muscle building and stuff like. I think eggs have a 100 score, whey protein is around 100, then like chicken, beef, etcetera, they’re all in the high 90s. And then you’re looking at other like sources like, for example, wheat protein is about 50. Collagen scores 0 on that. To be very clear, it is very different to other amino acids and 

Aidan

00:09:15 – 00:09:55

even on that topic, 10% of the collagen remains intact as peptides as well. So, it doesn’t all get broken down like some of it still remains as collagen and peptides. And in terms of the mechanism, that’s where the timing comes into play. So, collagen – these amino acids peak in the blood about 40 to 60 minutes after you ingest them. So, people have figured out the timing based on that. That’s why they’ve chosen that timing. These amino acids are peaking in the blood, and ideally, you’re doing the rehab session or training or whatever and getting a ton of blood flow through that area. And if you’re thinking about in terms of tendons, think of the tendon like a sponge soaking up these amino acids during that time. 

Aidan

00:09:56 – 00:10:21

And because the blood’s going through, the amino acids are travelling, that’s how we target it. And if that’s not enough because, like I get it, that’s very theoretical. We do have research measuring collagen synthesis increasing in these areas which is the important part. That’s part of where I’m going on with the mechanisms and stuff like that, being like it’s all well and good to theoretically dismiss the mechanism, but when we have research showing that there’s actual outcomes, we can’t just dismiss it because of that. Basically.

Leah

00:10:21 – 00:10:41

Yeah. So, I suppose your interest is predominantly in collagen supplementation for injury? Um, there’s not a lot of evidence I believe around gut health and like all those other things. So do you want to talk about, I suppose, how you found it to be effective for your own injury and for your clients?

Aidan

00:10:41 – 00:11:23

Yeah. So, this is where it gets interesting as well. So, the first thing I’ll start off with is in terms of the facts in terms of research. So, when I started collagen, there’s about a two times increase in the collagen synthesis post rehab session if you’re doing it. So, it’s like it’s dramatically speeding up the process. Um, theoretically, you could train multiple times per day as well. There are certain rehab protocols where people are rehabbing three times per day, shorter sessions, so they’re not completely overloading themselves like they’re doing the same total volume. But they’re spreading the sessions out six hours apart across the entire day and having collagen before every single session. Theoretically, collagen synthesis is therefore sped up by about two times through pretty much the entire day. 

Aidan

00:11:24 – 00:12:09

Theoretically, this is a leap of faith, but maybe that halves how long it takes to rehab an injury. Like that’s probably a little bit too ambitious. And that’s not something I’m actually saying, but it’s like it is going to speed things up if you have your training appropriate. And that’s the key thing, like coming back to like this is why we can’t study it in humans and stuff like that. Well, animal studies show us something from like a 20% to 100% increase in healing rates, basically, when they use collagen supplementation. And not only that, but there’s better, like better physical properties of the tendons, like the tendons actually heal better. Um, what I find difficult when it comes to humans, though, and particularly tendinopathy, because it is an overload injury, is what if the collagen supplementation 

Aidan

00:12:10 – 00:12:38

boosts recovery by 20%? Does that mean you recover 20% quicker? like I’m going to use myself as an example. But like every time I feel good, my knee feels good, I go out and play more basketball or I lift heavier weights. So I’m like there’s setbacks to the curve due to the actual increase, like there’s only so much you can do from a nutrition perspective. If your rehab is on point and you’re loading the appropriate amount, it’s probably gonna dramatically speed things up. The closest we have to 

Aidan

00:12:38 – 00:12:58

that kind of stuff in the actual research, because, as I said, it’s early days, and it’s very hard to measure that in humans because most of this stuff will be done on professional athletes who have competitions to compete and stuff like that. They might get back too early and stuff like that. But the closest we’ve got is certain case studies like there’s one, once again by Keith Bar. Well, there’s two I’m actually gonna mention. One of them 

Aidan

00:12:59 – 00:13:28

is on an NBA player, and he had tendinopathy. So that’s the same injury that I’ve got so I understand that relatively well. And a lot of experts in that space often talk about the concept of treating the doughnut. Not the whole, as in the whole is the injured area. And there’s some healthy tendon around that area. And the concept that most people say is we’re probably not ever going to heal the injured area. Let’s just try and get the healthy area around that to handle the load well enough that you don’t feel pain. In this case study, this NBA player 

Aidan

00:13:29 – 00:13:51

Actually healed the injured area, which is incredibly rare, like they just had collagen before their rehab sessions, which were actually just isometrics. They did a strength training protocol as well, just through the strength and conditioning coach and the collagen seemed to make a difference as there is MRI evidence of that. And another example, once again, by Dr Keith Bar, is of a discus thrower who had patella tendinopathy as well in both of his knees. 

Aidan

00:13:51 – 00:14:18

And he did isometrics five times per week for seven weeks. No other training because he was in so much pain to start off with that he couldn’t do other training. And once again, he got an MRI at the end of it, and there was no – like if a doctor saw it fresh, they couldn’t see any form of patella tendinopathy, which is incredibly rare, usually two years later the injured area is still there. So, there seems to be very tangible outcomes here. But it’s also very hard to study in humans because we change our behaviours basically. 

Leah

00:14:19 – 00:14:28

Yeah, well, what about in the area, I suppose, of prevention? Or if someone’s more prone to something like tendinopathy. Is it useful there? 

Aidan

00:14:28 – 00:14:59

I think so. So, we don’t have evidence backing that up. There’s no studies on that. But like if I’ve got a powerlifter who’s going through competition prep and they get that elbow pain every single time, of course I’m gonna have them take collagen. Even from my experience, like I’m just thinking about in terms of being like what if they get through two more weeks of good training before their elbow flares up? They get two more good bench sessions, two more good squat sessions. All of those kinds of things, technically four bench sessions given how powerlifting training goes, like two times a week benching, um, but yeah that’s worthwhile. 

Aidan

00:14:59 – 00:15:28

And what if it’s so good that they don’t actually end up with any issues? And like even jumping onto another topic with that, theoretically, it can build stronger tendons to start off with. Maybe that translates to better powerlifting performance as well. Even in sports, there’s some people who are theorising that this might help with vertical jumps and sprint times and stuff like that. Like stronger Achilles tendons could help. Um, that’s the leap of faith and, like the research hasn’t been done yet, But it is an interesting area as well to look at. 

Leah

00:15:29 – 00:15:40

Yeah, I suppose looking into enhanced athletes as well, in terms of the issue with their ligaments and tendons that don’t keep up with the muscle growth. Would it be particularly useful there?

Aidan

00:15:40 – 00:16:08

I think so, for sure. Like I am a very strong believer in that, and that, honestly, is part of why I use it with a lot of athletes as well. Something that I have been thinking about a lot more recently, though, is like there’s this concept that muscles can grow quicker than tendons, and that is the issue that we’re talking about here. What about that discus thrower though? The one who had very injured patella tendons and then only seven weeks later were completely healthy? There is a bit of evidence that when a tendon is injured, 

Aidan

00:16:09 – 00:16:27

Tendon turnover rate is actually a lot quicker than when you have healthy tendons. So, it’s like who’s to say that like – yeah, I don’t know. So, like, I do think it makes sense for enhanced athletes to be using it. But, like maybe tendons can grow quicker under certain circumstances than we normally give them credit for as well. 

Leah

00:16:27 – 00:16:47

Swinging back around to the biological value of collagen protein. Logistically I guess, when you’re planning for an athlete and you’re looking at their total daily protein intake, Do you tend to count that? I guess 20 or 30 grams of protein as part of that? Or because it’s so low biological value, do you give them a little bit more? 

Aidan

00:16:47 – 00:17:11

Yeah, it’s a hard one to answer. So, like it’s a yes or no answer. It depends on how much total they’re having. For example, if you’re having somebody doing that three times per day protocol and every single time was 20 grams, we’re talking like 60 grams. That’s a lot. So, it’s like you’d be very silly if we’re using, say, a range of like 1.6 to 2.2 grams per kilogramme bodyweight of protein and we’re at the low end of that range. 

Aidan

00:17:11 – 00:17:38

And then 60 gram was made up of that then, yes. I would 100% look at giving more. Me personally with my athletes, I do tend to just go on the higher end of the protein range to start off with. So it’s like say that 1.6 grams per kilogramme of body weight protein is going to cover it for almost everybody as an example, and I’m giving them 2 to 2.2 or whatever to start off with. The question no longer matters because it’s all right. Like they’re high enough. Anyway, that doesn’t really matter basically. 

Leah

00:17:39 – 00:17:59

Yeah. Okay, um, the question I suppose I get all the time when I do briefly talk about collagen supplementation is, can we get it through food? Like things like bone broth and all these things that, you know people talk about, that do contain some collagen. Can you utilise that, or is the amount too high in what you need? 

Aidan

00:17:59 – 00:18:37

Yes. So, back in 2017, when I did my course at the AIS, they were using bone broth with athletes back then for that exact same reason. They’re like people do like food first approach, if we have access to it we might as well use it. Um, but not long after that, there was a study that came out from the US. They were studying it there. Rebecca Alcock did a study measuring the collagen content of bone broth, and it was just so inconsistent in terms of like, a lot of the time, the collagen content is too low. It’s nowhere near that 15 plus gram amount. 

Aidan

00:18:37 – 00:19:02

Sometimes it is, but you don’t know what you’re getting and oftentimes it is too low. Um, there are certain athletes like, um, Kobe Bryant comes to mind, and a few others who, like you, look at their diets like back in the day and stuff like that. And they were having bone broth like three times a day. It’s like having bone broth three times a day. You’re probably actually reaching this collagen amount, like they’re not nailing the timing or anything like that. But, like a lot of athletes are having a tonne of bone broth when they’re talking about it. 

Aidan

00:19:03 – 00:19:40

I suppose that’s the one thing. The other thing to consider is the concept of eating the entire animal. Like if you do eat the tendons and ligaments, etc an animal, you are getting collagen through there.  That’s incredibly rare. It’s often unappealing for most people as well but it is an option. It is like there’s a guy named Ben Greenfield, he has a podcast as well, and like he talks about like you look at his diet and he’s got like, bone broth multiple times today and he eats like tendons and ligaments and stuff like that, like he’s having so much. It’s like, well there’s no need for collagen supplementation when you’re doing that. But when we look at those options, it’s like most people aren’t going to really do either of those things in terms of having a ton of bone broth and 

Aidan

00:19:41 – 00:19:48

having a ton of like that kind of animal content. So, it’s not really practical for most people to try and get through food. 

Leah

00:19:48 – 00:20:00

What about being completely, I guess, an animal sourced supplement? Are there any options for people that are plant based or vegan to get the same thing or the same outcome? 

Aidan

00:20:00 – 00:20:29

Yes. So, when originally wanted to learn about this. I didn’t really think there was any option, and it was really disappointing to me because, as we’ve spoken about, I was always considered, um, it possible to get the exact same result from a vegan diet as you can on an omnivorous diet if you set it up well. I’ve always been a massive believer in that, and I’ve always wanted to believe that, too, to be honest. And then I learned about collagen, and I was like, oh, no, there’s one difference here. Like it’s this collegan thing. But like after thinking about that a lot, I was like, 

Aidan

00:20:30 – 00:21:04

My logic with why collagen supplementation works is because of the amino acids being elevated in the blood at that time that you’re doing the rehab session and everything like that. It is not the collagen supplementation itself that’s magical, it’s the amino acids. Um, because of that, you could theoretically purchase all of those amino acids in the same ratio as collagen supplementation and have that before a workout. There’s no reason you couldn’t do that, although it could be impractical. You’d have to find a way to make it taste all right as well. And there’s a lot of logistics, but theoretically, you can do that. You know? 

Leah

00:21:04 – 00:21:10

What I’m surprised about is obviously there are vegan collagen supplements on the market, or they at least call themselves that. 

Leah

00:21:10 – 00:21:12

But none of them do that, and none of them, they 

Aidan

00:21:12 – 00:21:13

don’t take that approach. No, 

Aidan

00:21:13 – 00:21:23

none of them do. Yeah, and, like, I honestly have never heard of anybody taking that approach as well. It’s like an idea I’ve thought about, and I am pretty confident it would work. But I’ve never seen anybody try it. 

Leah

00:21:24 – 00:21:36

Yeah. What are typically vegan collagen supplements? I mean, I’ve seen like agar agar ones. Are they predominantly just not even related to collagen whatsoever or they’re more just the consistency of what a collagen supplement is? 

Aidan

00:21:36 – 00:22:03

Often, they’re like that. Sometimes they use gelatine which, fun fact, is pretty much the same. Like they try to mimic what the texture of gelatine is, and stuff like that which is nutritionally the same as collagen for reference. Um, but yeah, it is agar agar, and sometimes they use other random ingredients for joint health, and stuff like that, like that could be linked with that. So sometimes there is some form of attempt, but usually they are very low in the amino acids, or they just are low in protein in general. 

Leah

00:22:03 – 00:22:08

Well, being that amino acids that I suppose have the value in injury, um, 

Leah

00:22:09 – 00:22:09

is there 

Leah

00:22:09 – 00:22:15

any way you can get that from increasing your total daily protein intake? or is taking a collagen supplement easier? 

Aidan

00:22:15 – 00:22:48

100%. So that’s another big point that a lot of people have made. They’ve just been like, why don’t you get a high enough total protein? And the big unfortunate answer is, as I said, it’s a very different amino acid profile in that like, as in, they are amino acids that you will get through other protein sources is just the amount. Like in collagen, they have incredibly high amounts of those four amino acids, whereas in other protein sources, they don’t like, for example, like whey protein will be really high in lysine and stuff like that. Um, there’s just not much overlap between those. So that’s really the logic and then the other piece of logic, which 

Aidan

00:22:49 – 00:23:27

I’ve heard people say, and I don’t really have an opinion on it, but it is worth having a discussion about, maybe there’s a ratio of amino acids. For example, we didn’t really talk about it, but like, I am also of the opinion that collagen doesn’t really do anything for gut health at all. But a lot of the people in the gut health, like in that kind of field, think it does matter for gut health, talk about ratios, and they’re like if you do not get a good ratio, having a high total protein intake is making this worse because you need this ratio to offset that. So, I don’t really believe that, but it is worth like, considering that that could be a possibility. Maybe not for gut health, but maybe just for everything else collagen is useful for. 

Leah

00:23:27 – 00:23:38

Yeah, totally. Is there anything else you think we’ve missed from this discussion? I suppose in terms of the research, mechanisms or anything else that you feel is important in collagen supplementation for injury?

Aidan

00:23:38 – 00:24:16

I suppose to a certain degree collagen and muscle growth. So, like when we’re talking about, like injury, rehab and stuff like that, often muscle growth as a priority like there’s either people have been able to train that area for a long period of time, or they might have inhibition around the area because the pain and stuff like that so they can’t train it effectively. And one thing I really want to touch on, and this is relevant to the people who aren’t even using, like I said, a ton of people who just use collagen as their main protein source and or protein powder, collagen is really bad for muscle protein synthesis. Like when you look at protein powders, whey protein is the gold standard, 

Aidan

00:24:16 – 00:24:22

but you compare whey protein to like soy protein, and would you agree that there’s not that much difference between whey and soy protein? 

Leah

00:24:22 – 00:24:23

Yeah, they’re pretty similar.

Speaker 0

00:24:23 – 00:25:05

Yeah, and like other, there’s other vegan protein powders, particularly when you combine them and stuff like that. The outcomes of muscle protein synthesis are very similar, and then you try collagen, and it’s like 50% of the muscle protein synthesis of all those other ones. It’s a massive outlier, so it does help a bit of muscle protein synthesis. But it’s really terrible in comparison to the other ones. Um, one interesting discussion I heard on ATP science podcast, I do not recommend listening to them, but they talked about how that could be a bit of red herring when it comes to muscle growth, where like we always think of muscle growth and muscle protein synthesis as being very aligned, as in the real formulas, like muscle protein synthesis minus muscle protein breakdown. But they talked about how, um 

Aidan

00:25:06 – 00:25:34

the muscle is surrounded by fascia, which is connective tissue. Theoretically, collagen could help with the growth of muscle fascia, allowing for more muscle protein synthesis to occur down the line and more muscle growth to occur. I have not seen anything to back up that claim, but, like I also think it’s worth mentioning. It’s like, well, maybe they’re right. Maybe there’s a chance that they are right. So, I always chuck that out there. But at this stage, I’d consider it relatively poor for muscle growth, and I would look at other amino acids and other protein and stuff like that for that purpose. 

Leah

00:25:34 – 00:25:45

So, if someone is using collagen supplementation, I suppose, as their main source of protein around training, you’d obviously say, maybe you should go for something with a higher biological value as well?

Aidan

00:25:45 – 00:25:48

For sure, if the goal is muscle growth, I would definitely say that. 

Leah

00:25:49 – 00:26:10

Awesome. So that about wraps things up for today. I definitely feel like we’ve learnt a fair bit about collagen supplementation more than I knew before, for sure. Um, so I hope you all enjoyed that as well. We’ll be back next week. And in the meantime, we would love you to rate and subscribe to the podcast if you can.